Author Topic: Modern Uses for Ancient Oils  (Read 253 times)

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Offline ccawthon

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Modern Uses for Ancient Oils
« on: January 28, 2020, 08:30:40 AM »

Topic:  The Oils of Ancient Scripture


FRANKINCENSE:  Considered the "holy anointing oil" throughout the Middle East, this essential oil is made from the resin of a tree called the Boswelia Carteri. This oil was given to the Baby Jesus and God has given it to us as well. How I love this one! Itís part of my daily skincare routine mixed in a bit of coconut oil and applied as a facial moisturizer.  It's my help when feeling blah . . . I just add a drop or two to my palm, rub my hands together gently and cup my nose for several deep breaths. Then I massage what's left in my hands around my neck and face. I can also take this one in a capsule or add a drop under my tongue when Iím feeling a little rundown.


MYRRH: The most commonly-referenced aromatic oil in the Bible. It is the first oil to be mentioned in Genesis 37:25 and the last in Revelation 18:13. Myrrh is another oil created from a tree resin and it is wonderful for skin conditions. Some speculate that Jesusí mother may have used it for stretch marks.


In Scripture we read of a plant called "aloes." This is not the aloe that we think of in terms of a cactus . . . . Rather, this early aloewood is likely to be what we now call SANDALWOOD. It is mentioned in Psalm 45:8 as a perfume, along with Myrrh and Cassia and again in Proverbs 7:17. Sandalwood is another great skin oil and it also enhances deep sleep. Who doesnít need those two?


Hereís one that might be new to you. CASSIA is the bark from an evergreen tree originating in southern China. It's similar to, but much hotter than, cinnamon oil. Just think how far Cassia had to travel to get to the Middle East -- it was an expensive oil! Ezekiel 27:19 lists it as a trading commodity along with wine, wrought iron, and other pricey items.


Then thereís CEDARWOOD which is believed to be the very first essential oil ever distilled. Its history in medicinal and practical uses traces back to the Egyptians and Sumerians. The Cedars of Lebanon were magnificent, towering trees that could live as long as 2000 years.  Cedarwood has many, many uses including for skin and hair and helping get a restful nightís sleep. My personal favorite use for Cedarwood is as a focus and study help.


Have you ever heard of ONYCHA? This one is mentioned as an ingredient in the Holy Incense of Exodus 30. That's the only place it's mentioned and historians arenít really settled on its origins. One group believes it is the Styrax Benzoin (the oil included in our collection). The second historical reference to Onycha is in the description of a snail-like mollusk found in the Red Sea. Because mollusks were among the forbidden items listed for the Jews in Leviticus, this is highly unlikely the source of our beloved Onycha, which can be a great addition to a massage and itís wonderfully uplifting as well as good on the skin and used for healthful breathing.


Then thereís CISTUS which is also known as Rose of Sharon. Traditionally a resin from the Cistus was used as an ingredient in incense and was used medicinally to treat colds, coughs, menstrual cramps and rheumatism.


Historically, MYRTLE was used in religious ceremonies as part of purification rituals. Did you know that the Hebrew word for "Myrtle" is the feminine form of the word "hadas" where we get Hadassah -- which is Queen Esther's Jewish name? Yes, Esther, the bride of the Persian King Xerxes. Myrtle is wonderful for both children and adults. It has a mood elevating influence and is a good choice for massaging onto the calves of your legs for those annoying cramps. Additionally my grandchildren enjoy having Myrtle massaged lightly on to their chest when they have a cough.


In Scripture we find the primary use of HYSSOP was for ritual cleansing and ceremonial offerings. Leviticus 13 contains instructions for a ritual cleansing of lepers using Hyssop and Cedarwood. Hyssop branches were used to mark the doors of the Israelites' homes with lamb's blood. Hyssop has been used traditionally for almost a millennium for its antiseptic properties and is believed to stimulate creativity.


Lastly we will discuss the CYPRESS tree. These were commonplace in biblical times, used for building ships and houses, statues and part of the Egyptian sarcophagus. Emotionally Cypress essential oil supports feelings of security and stability which led to its use for the floors of the temple. Used in biblical times for multiple purposes, there are records dating back to 1800 BC mentioning the use of Cypress oil for health concerns.


This is a longer post but I hope you found something helpful here. There are several books on this topic. Please let me know if I can provide any research or help you find print resources.
You are the gatekeeper of your home.
Natural wellness ➳ the simple lifestyle.
Oiled up. Prayed up. Prepared.

Offline goodshot

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Re: Modern Uses for Ancient Oils
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2020, 05:42:13 AM »
I always thought Hyssop was the oregano that grows in the Mediterranean.  I use Oil of Oregano gel caps with GREAT success.
 I have been mixing some Frankincense with some blue gel analgesic cream for knees and it seems to work well.

Offline ccawthon

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Re: Modern Uses for Ancient Oils
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2020, 01:23:33 PM »
Good input @goodshot. Oh my yes! Oregano is a favorite for so many things but especially when I'm starting to feel that something is coming on. My family has several amazing Oregano stories where otherwise a pharma antibiotic would have been an alternative, including my Brown Recluse bite a few years back.


This is Hyssop officinalis. The blooms look a lot like lavender blooms and they have a minty aroma but the leaves are bitter. It is native to southern Europe, the Middle East, and the region surrounding the Caspian Sea. It's also a great aid to the body's natural response to irritation and injury (much like Oregano).


Some of this info came from the book, "Shemen:  Oils of the Ancient World," by Joshua Graff.
You are the gatekeeper of your home.
Natural wellness ➳ the simple lifestyle.
Oiled up. Prayed up. Prepared.