Author Topic: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity  (Read 2132 times)

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Offline thxmrgarand

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Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« on: May 02, 2013, 09:04:56 AM »
The federal government requires the State of Alaska to disregard its Constitution and allow all "rural" residents (basically, anyone who doesn't live in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau or Ketchikan) to hunt waterfowl in the spring.  The gun most commonly used is a .22 rifle or pistol, especially several weeks from now when the birds are molting and cannot fly.  This AP article running in Alaska newspapers indicates that the .22 ammo shortage is hurting spring duck and goose shooting.
The Associated Press
BETHEL, ALASKA A nationwide frenzy to buy up ammunition is having an impact in rural Alaska.
Carl Anvil, who owns a gun shop in Bethel, has been waiting three months for an order of .22-caliber ammunition, KYUK reports.
He recently had about two dozen boxes on the shelf for customers and a few more in the back. His other supplies of ammunition are dwindling, too, as hunters opt to use larger caliber rifles and shotguns.
Other retailers in town said they have no idea when they'll get more ammunition in stock.
The run on ammunition began with President Barack Obama's re-election in November and was followed by the mass shooting at a Connecticut school in December. That shooting prompted Obama to push to strengthen federal gun controls, raising concerns among some gun owners.
But Anvil said rural Alaskans "don't run around trying to buy up ammo to sell it for some crazy amount. We use it up here. So it's for subsistence use."

Read more here: http://www.adn.com/2013/05/02/2887531/gun-shops-in-bethel-struggle-to.html#storylink=cpy


Offline Bigeasy

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2013, 11:23:01 AM »
Honestly, Its hard for me to feel sorry for them.  If you were a "subsistence" hunter, and knew you had to have at least a couple boxes of .22's to hunt spring waterfowl, you know, to eat and survive.....Why would you not plan ahead.  Prior to December, a brick (500 rounds) was commonly available for like $20.00.  Never thought to have at least that in reserve?, or at least acquire a few 50 round boxes during the course of the last 4 or 5 months?  I think if I had to hunt to eat, I would have planned a little better...
 
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Offline spruce

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2013, 01:01:07 PM »
rural Alaskans "don't run around trying to buy up ammo to sell it for some crazy amount"  ??
 
Well, SOMEBODY up in Alaska must have been running around buying up all the existing stocks of ammo - otherwise the shelves wouldn't be empty!  To think Alaska would be exempt from scalpers and hoarders seems kind of naive to me.
 
I'm sure they can find a few boxes to hunt with, but they may have to pay a premium price for it.

Offline deernhog

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2013, 04:28:31 PM »
If some of those substinance hunters are like some mexican fisherman I have dealt with they don't have money to stock pile back like most of us do. I went out with two guys and they treated the $20 WalMart combos like they were gold and they only had 4 or 5 hooks, a very few weights and a few assorted jigs. We only broke off once but you have thought his wife left when he lost the rig. Probably the same with the natives up there, just kept enough to get by on.
Deer hunting is mostly fun then you shoot one and it turns to work.

Offline Specklebelly

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2013, 04:51:18 PM »
Am I the only one that thinks it is strange to allow the hunting of waterfowl during the breeding seasons?  Ducks not sitting on eggs is not a good thing in my book. 
Specklebelly

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Offline spruce

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2013, 01:42:04 PM »
I think some other of Alaska's game and fish laws would probably seem "strange" to those of us in the other 49 states.
A lot of them I think have to do with the Native people's traditional ways of subsistence hunting/fishing.
 
It would be interesting to know what the impact of spring hunting has on the duck population, but they've been doing it for centuries and there are still ducks!

Offline Bugflipper

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2013, 03:01:11 PM »
If a fellow is dependent on a box of 22s to live off of, doesn't have the forethought to stock up, well he better be a good snarer. Even in remote areas, let's say they double the price of a brick to get it there. $40-60 is a bargain compared to $500 a fifth of alcohol. The last time Obama was elected the same thing happened. People had 3 years to get their ammunition sorted out. If a fellow already went through it once and didn't have enough sense the second time, shame on him.
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Offline thxmrgarand

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2013, 05:26:03 AM »
FYI, anyone living in Alaska other than the cities cited qualifies for subsistence harvest, and since the feds have taken control and management of fish and game away from the state there is almost no enforcement of whatever law applies (if in fact there is any law at all).  As you might expect, game is wasted in huge quantities.  And there are many anomalies in the law; for instance the ban on lead shot is rigidly enforced by the feds around the cities that don't qualify for subsistence but stores in the rest of Alaska still sell lead shot for waterfowl hunting and that doesn't seem to bother the feds.  For a while the feds (the taxpayers that is) gave free steel shot ammo to rural hunters but that seems to have ended.


There are lots of other anomalies, some of them pertaining to taking of marine mammals, including polar bear, which are by federal law supposed to be limited to Alaska Natives (and possibly their spouses - the law is not particularly followed on that and unclear on just who is an Alaska Native).  An example of another anomaly is that people who qualify for subsistence based upon where they claim their residence can shoot deer from their boats.  The state prohibits that because with sloppy weather and rocky beaches being common many hunters are too lazy to investigate whether they hit a deer (or elk, moose, etc.) if the animal didn't drop at the shot on the beach.  So if you're going to shoot at something on the beach you need a rural resident on the boat with you.  I agree with the state law by the way, and you can imagine what state fish and game people think of the feds since the feds took management away from the state but the feds have no management. 


The state has strict laws prohibiting wasting of fish and game.  The feds apparently do not.


With private land almost nonexistent in Alaska you can imagine how difficult the feds can make fish and game management in Alaska for the state.  Recently the state has stood up to the feds in one area; the scarcity of king salmon runs in the Yukon River.  The feds have backed down for some reason in that one instance, possibly because the feds have screwed it up so badly and want to escape blame.


Federal interference in Alaska life is the reason the feds spend so much money in Alaska.  Over half of all US Dept. of Interior employees work in Alaska!  When news reports show how much federal money is spent here it's important to realize that it is not a benefit to Alaskans.

Offline spruce

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Re: Spring waterfowl hunt hurt by .22 ammo prices, scarcity
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2013, 07:53:51 AM »
Interesting.
 
Proves once again nobody can screw things up worse, or waste more money doing it, than the Feds.
 
Hey, let's have them take over our healthcare! ;D