Author Topic: Cure for Mouthing/Biting  (Read 2450 times)

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Offline Leatherstocking

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Cure for Mouthing/Biting
« on: March 06, 2008, 04:41:48 PM »
We have a new lab mix pup that has gotten really mouthy lately. I expect some, but she has gotten pretty bad with it. It's been a while since I had a pup and was wondering if anyone here has any ideas for curbing her mouthiness. I can usually handle her biting calmy and firmly, but it's a particular problem with the kids. Thanks!
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Offline Mikey

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Re: Cure for Mouthing/Biting
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2008, 02:19:17 AM »
Leatherstocking:  Mouthing, chewing or biting (even softly) is a sign of dominance or possession, especially in puppies that need to establish themselves.  Small children often fall victim to this, as they are small and defenseless in the dog's mind, and may suffer a few light bites or even skin punctures as a result of the dog being firm, possessive or dominant with them. 

The Dog Whisperer show on the cable network's National Geographic channel deals with this behavior quite often as it is common in puppies and even larger dogs.  Their position is that if the animal is demostrating a behavior you do not want to continue, cause the animal to stop and initiate another, more acceptable behavior.  This is a show well worth watching if you haven't seen it yet.

For example:  when my 3 y/o 90lb Bouvier des Flandres starts mouthing or chewing on my hand I say 'No'!  Then I command him to 'Sit', and command him to 'kiss'.  The 'Sit' and 'Kiss' commands are for the acceptable behavior, which is whatcha want.  The focus here is that an unwanted behavior is corrected with a command for the animal to do something else in order to get its attention off or away from its dominant behavior and to make it understand it is subordinate to you, the Master..........  Then if you wish you can reward the dog for its proper, submissive behavior (sit, kiss, lay down, etc.)

Do not be afraid to use the 'No' word.  They understand, even as puppies.  Even labs understand that and they like to chew....  HTH.  Mikey.

Offline Leatherstocking

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Re: Cure for Mouthing/Biting
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2008, 05:00:02 PM »
Mikey,

Thanks for the advice. That's basically what we try to do. The hard part is getting the kids to do it. We'll keep at it. I've seen that show on the guide but never watched it. I'll have to check it out next time I see it.

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Offline TonyS

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Re: Cure for Mouthing/Biting
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2014, 03:15:34 AM »
When the dog does this open its mouth and put your fingers over the lips so that they come in contact with the teeth.  Squeeze and say 'no bites'.  Dogs catch on pretty fast.

Offline 52bagman

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Re: Cure for Mouthing/Biting
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2014, 06:53:08 AM »
I've had heelers for years and they always want to mouth. I take hold of their bottom jaw until they realize they are caught, tell them no bite and then turn loose. Works for me.
Also helps when someone strange shows up and you tell the dog no bite. The dog understands and the person wonders?