Author Topic: Homemade stands  (Read 10160 times)

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Offline snapcrackpop

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Homemade stands
« on: March 16, 2007, 06:45:43 AM »
I think this topic should be a sticky.  It's a great topic and will be asked many times.

I would suggest that the posts include links, photos and details as much as possible.
Land Owner great link about those Y-boards!

Here's my favorite homemade.  2 16' treated 2x4's, 2x2's for steps.  Eye bolts or heavy staples to attach rachet straps (would recommend using a large nail or screw step to attach the center to the tree).
Bolts to attach supports, wingnuts preferred. Pallet or plywood for the floor.

This design using 2x4 legs and 2x2 ladder rungs should not be used by anyone over 200 pounds and is marginal at that weight even if all PT lumber is used. You can't put enough large enough nails into a 2x2 without weakening the wood. Graybeard.

If you can make the ladder wide enough to fit on a deer cart you can move it with one hand.

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Offline Land_Owner

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2007, 08:00:13 AM »
Chap Gleason did a fine job with his "Y-Boards".  I like what you have done with your ladder stand. 

If I understand correctly, you set up the seat by unfolding the diagonal supports, which are then thru-bolted to pre-drilled holes in the ladder, and lean the seat against the tree(?). 

Looks like you already saw my post in "tree stands?" on this Forum about using a block and tackle to enable a one man erection of a ladder stand weighing up to 200 pounds.  This is fundamentally what I mean by block and tackle... http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/ROPE119-19797-584.html  Perhaps this will assist you too.

Offline snapcrackpop

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2007, 09:00:42 AM »
Chap Gleason did a fine job with his "Y-Boards".  I like what you have done with your ladder stand.

If I understand correctly, you set up the seat by unfolding the diagonal supports, which are then thru-bolted to pre-drilled holes in the ladder, and lean the seat against the tree(?). 
Yep.  Block and tackle needed, or another person(bigger the better).

And here is the link for Chap Gleason's Y-Board http://www.the-gleasons.com/low_cost_tree_stands_for_hunting.htm
Y-Board...took me a while, it looks more like an H-Board to me..............................Oh, Y in-a-tree board. ;D
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Handi VP 22/410, 410, 20, 17M2, .223, 357MAX, 50cal ML SS w/MU plug


Offline Hammerspur

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2008, 12:14:45 PM »
Here's one I built (welded) with my brother for his use. It's large and roomy to fit his 6'2'' stocky frame (think Fred Flintstone):


This one is more the size of store bought hang-ons. I made 2 of these, one is still up in the woods... should retrieve it some day(year?) The one in the tree was so inconspicuous my friend said spotting it was like playing "Where's Waldo?" So I call it my Waldo Model:


This is a box type... security and stability for standing shots and tough to fall out of:


Here's a permanent  box type I built on private property of the rod & gun club of which I'm a member:

This is a death trap waiting to take someone's life. Graybeard.


This is the ladder stand I made. Three sections assemble to a seat height about 18 1/2 feet:


Close-up of the ladder-stand wheel showing hitch-pin through axle... allows wheels and axle to be quickly removed and stashed in the forrest duff:


Close-up of the ladder-stand cutting-bar and axle mount... if I retro-fit larger diameter wheels like those on Snapcrackpop's dolly and gusset the axle mounting ears the whole rig could serve as a deer cart as well:


This is what I'm thinking of picking up for hunting public land, Summit Open Shot (only 14 lbs!). Can get in and out with your whole kit n' caboodle quickly:


Steve



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Of course guns are dangerous... if they weren't they wouldn't be good for anything!

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2008, 12:47:55 PM »
That first one with the 2x4 legs and 2x2 ladder rungs would be just plain dangerous for a fellow of my weight and likely for many after a couple years of use. You need more than a 2x2 to support the weight and you just can't safely put enough nails in a board that small to safely support a fat rascal like me.

I never use less than a 2x6 or 4x4 if the height is 14' or more and use either 2x4s or 5/4x6 lumber as rungs and use a minimum of three 16d nails per rung per side to hold my weight.

Further down that permanent one on private land in the big pine is a death trap waiting to happen. Some day someone is gonna fall to the ground from that one without a doubt in my opinion. You MUST have something going to the ground to support the side away from the tree. You just cannot safely depend on the tree connection alone.

If this thread shows anymore I feel are gross safety hazards I'll either delete them or remove the thread altogether.


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Offline Hammerspur

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2008, 01:20:37 PM »
Wow! Bill I built that one off site from pressure treated lumber painted in enamel. There isn't a single nail or wood screw in it. Every joint is connected by nuts with heavy fender washers and threaded rod (5/8") running full width and all painted as well. The 45 degree side rails support the weight of stand and hunter securely. A triangle is a very strong shape and nature doesn't know if the load is standing atop or hanging from the point of strength. The stand is secured to the tree trunk well. I drilled completely through that tree trunk with an auger bit and hung it with threaded rod through the trunk side to side. If you zoom in on the pic you can see the rod ends protruding from the side rails where they attach to the tree and the full width rods running from left to right at the front of the rails.


Admittedly it is getting long in the tooth and has been out in the weather for awhile now. I probably should remove it at some point but it likely won't be easy... it's on there with a vengeance.

Bill, I wouldn't build or use a stand which would be unsafe, nor would I promote others to.


Steve
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Offline Graybeard

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2008, 01:52:36 PM »
That's clearly NOT obvious in the photo or stated in the text before now. Not many folks would have the equipment t drill thru a tree that size I sure don't.

Be aware that metal inside a tree deteriorates at a really rapid pace and worse yet there is no way to know the condition of it. The sap and other environment inside that tree wood is very caustic to metal. I used some huge nails once long ago that were fully 1/4" diameter and at least a foot or more long to make steps going up a huge old tree and then climbed using them as hand and foot holds to hang a hang on stand I took with me to the tree each time I went there. One day after maybe three years of use I grabbed one and it broke off in my hand. It was rusted almost completely thru just inside the wood of the tree. A lesson learned luckily with no harm to me. Had it been one up high rather than near ground level I might not be here to tell the tell.

Truly there is no way to look at a photo and be certain of the safety or lack of it of such a stand. I will ALWAYS take the conservative approach here and might at times be overly so but then I want to make absolutely certain no one gets funny ideas here that might get them hurt due to thinking a poor design might be a good one. As a result I'll always be very very cautious of designs I can't tell by looking are safe.

While I agree a triangle is a strong shape that wood back there where it connects thru to hold it up is not. That's a very long lever you have there when the weight is way out front. I just don't trust wood once it gets a bit of age to support my weight much less mine and that much stand weight in that manner. I use stands similar made of all PT wood and checked regularly but only when I have verticle supports to the ground at the side away from the tree.


Bill aka the Graybeard
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I am not a lawyer and do not give legal advice.

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Offline The Gamemaster

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2008, 03:28:06 AM »
I have built several treestands and none of them are portable - that is made out of wood.

A wood treestand does not travel well - because stick built construction doesn't like to be moved.

If you nail it, the nails pop loose, if you screw it, the screws has a tendency to break.

2 x 4's are very heavy.  That is why modern treestands are made out of aluminum.

Anyone that does not have good carpentry skills shouldn't try to build treestands.

The treestands that I built are designed specifically for the area and tree that I plan to hunt out of.

One is 5 feet x 8 feet and has walls and a porch and a roof and is made out of 2 x 10's and 5/4 treated decking.  The platform probably weighs 400 lbs.

The other one is 4 feet x 4 feet and is on double 2 x 4 legs.

It has walls and a roof and a fireplace.

I have moved it twice and both times it was a pain in the butt.

But if you put it in the right place, you won't ever have to move it again.

Offline 12ptdroptine

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2008, 10:44:52 AM »
I think this topic should be a sticky.  It's a great topic and will be asked many times.

I would suggest that the posts include links, photos and details as much as possible.
Land Owner great link about those Y-boards!

Here's my favorite homemade.  2 16' treated 2x4's, 2x2's for steps.  Eye bolts or heavy staples to attach rachet straps (would recommend using a large nail or screw step to attach the center to the tree).
Bolts to attach supports, wingnuts preferred. Pallet or plywood for the floor.

This design using 2x4 legs and 2x2 ladder rungs should not be used by anyone over 200 pounds and is marginal at that weight even if all PT lumber is used. You can't put enough large enough nails into a 2x2 without weakening the wood. Graybeard.

If you can make the ladder wide enough to fit on a deer cart you can move it with one hand.


I built one almost like this one.....5 years ago..16' treated 2x4 and mortised in 2x2 rungs...everything was glued and screwed...and chained up to the tree.I weigh 240 and felt safe in it for the first 4 years....The funny thing is that I buy my ladder stands for the same money it cost to build that thing...My son weigh's 280lbs and was getting in it..He took it down to move to another location this fall...It still isnt up. It has layed on the ground since.....In the spring it will be cut up and burned......I have som very heavy home made hang on's that I trust..made out of 1"x1/8 angle and 1"heavy tube......But no more wood for me..IMO reduction of safety is no bargain. I read an article once that stated more treestand accidents are from homemade wooden stands than any other

Offline Graybeard

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2008, 02:00:59 PM »
Quote
I read an article once that stated more treestand accidents are from homemade wooden stands than any other

Yup that's why I caution folks so much about these home made stands even tho I used them for almost 20 years myself before finally giving up climbing into trees completely. I tend to fall down a lot and just can't see taking the chance from up high anymore. My last time up in one of mine was almost the end of me.

I had hunted the morning from my very oldest stand which is 14' to the floor and was getting ready to climb down. For some reason totally unkown to me then or now I just turned loose completely from the stand with my feet on the first rung of the ladder. I felt myself falling backwards heading head first to the ground. I had a backpack on my back which would have just about assured I hit head first when I reached the ground.

Some how I manged to reach out with my hands and grab onto the pair of 2x12 boards that form the front of the stand to hide me from deer to the front. I got just enough of them with my finger tips to stop my fall. You can bet I hugged that ladder on the way down after that and I've not gone back into a treestand since and have no intention of ever doing so again. I just tend to fall from ladders and even on flat ground at times for no obvious reason. It's just too unsafe for me anymore.

I used either 2x6s or 4x4s as the ladder uprights on my stands. I placed them generally 24" apart outside to outside so the rungs could be made 24" wide and the rungs were made mostly from 5/4"x6" decking boards but at times with 2x4PT lumber. ALL wood used was PT with no exceptions. I used mostly 16d nails and three per side per rung for a total of six 16d nails holding each ladder rung onto the uprights.

I used 8' 2x6s attached at the top of the ladder set at an angle so the ladder angled out a bit at the bottom for easier climbing. I used 2x6s as braces as needed under the floor and around the two 8' boards that went around the tree. I used another section of 2x6 fixed firmly between those 8' boards that rested against the tree and then surrounded the tree with more of them to box it all in. I used huge nails to attach this entire boxed arrangement to the tree on four sides so it couldn't spin on the tree. I also used angle iron pieces driven into the ground deeply and then nailed or bolted to the base of the ladder to keep it from moving.

I covered the top with either 2x6, 2x8 or 5/4x6 and generally made it either 4'x4' or at times 4'x6' in size. Some I further reinforced and added sides and roof to make them into shacks that completely covered you from view of the deer and helped keep out the wind some. Most times I left the sides front and back partially open and covered them with burlap netting to hide me from deer but still allow easy shooting when needed.

I put up many of these stands in several locations over the years beginning back in '88 when the first one went up. That tree later fell in a storm and damaged the stand but didn't destroy it. I took it apart as best I could and rebuilt it and put it back up using new parts for what was damaged and it still stands today against an old oak just 15' to 20' from the original location. It's still solid but the tree has grown enough that it has begun to push the boards out away from it but they are still locked to it and you still cannot move it from ground level or up at the stand level. The roof was made of PT plywood and eventually rotted out anyway. The floor is 5/4"x6 decking boards painted with oil base paint and are as solid as when new.

I'll never climb into it again but the land owner and other folks who still hunt there still use it every season. I've shot more deer from that one stand than from any one spot that I've ever hunted. It's still in an excellent spot and deer move past it regularly all year long. It has been there for so long that generations of deer have been born seeing it as they move about daily and it's just accepted as a normal part of the landscape no different than the trees are.


Bill aka the Graybeard
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I am not a lawyer and do not give legal advice.

Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life anyone who believes in Him will have everlasting life!

Offline Jal5

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2008, 05:09:03 PM »
I have a personal rule on tree stands of any kind, homemade or manufactured: I never get into a stand that i don't know who put up in the tree and how they put it up. I trust my best hunting buddy because he and I inspect those stands each year and all are manufactured except for one shooting house that we built that I think would survive a hurricane! Other than that it is not worth the risk in my opinion. I was sorely tempted to break my rule this year in a new spot on a friends property that had a climber sitting out in a very strategic tree but I passed and don't regret it.

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Offline Land_Owner

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2008, 12:17:53 AM »
I replaced all wooden tree stands with metal ones last year, concrete sill where legs contact the ground, chain and chain binder where seat meets tree, intermediate ladder stanchion back to the tree for stability, and I still do not feel safe...because metal corrodes, bolts gall at holes, thin steel rips, and tubes bend, to name a few obvious failure points.

Gravity works only one way and most of us are adversely affected by it when things go wrong.  Feeling "secure" and falling asleep are the most insidious dangers when sitting on a "perch", like a bird (which we're NOT).

Offline snapcrackpop

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2008, 03:48:27 AM »
You're right.  Thanks for  heads up.:-[

Last year it felt pretty solid, but I decided I didn't like the height.
This spring I'll shorten it by 4 feet and use 2x4s for the ladder rungs.

I wrote "use a safety harness" on the ladder rungs.

I have the 14 pound Summit Openshot, I love it and use it the most!

Snap

Oh, BTW I weigh 170.
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Offline deerhuntertyler

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2009, 05:59:08 AM »
this winter I built a deer stand (non portable) out of wood. It is enclosed with 4 walls and a roof, has 4 4X4 post holding it up (not in a tree). It is 4.5'X6', the walls go 3.5' up and then are open up to the 6' high ceiling so that I can bow hunt out of it. It has 2X6s for the ladder and 2X4 rungs. It is all stained brown to prevent roting for as long as possible. And best of all I only spent $23.68 on the hole thing! I get a bunch of 2X10s and 2X12s for free from my dad's work and I used the table saw to cut them into 2X4s and 2X3s. The stain was left over from our deck and I just needed to buy hinges for the door and a latch, rubber roofing, and a rope to haul up the gun or bow. I will get pictures as soon as I can but it might be a weak or two sorry.
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Offline Big Nasty

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2010, 07:56:10 AM »
I can not believe that with all the hunters here not one redneck such as myself posted a picture of a pickup cab. I hope summer hasn't fried our brains that bad.
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Offline hillbill

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2010, 04:17:38 PM »
im thinking of placeing my backhoe and bulldozer at strategic places on my property and encloseing the rops with burlap. they have nice seats and the deer are used to seeing them. does this count?

Offline hunt-m-up

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2010, 05:06:28 PM »
Commercial fixed stands and ladder stands of all kinds are available at a variety of price points and as plain or fancy as you prefer. I realize some people use scrap metal, etc. to fabricate their own, been there done that, it's not worth it. I also haven't seen any mention of full body safety harnesses, at least spend the money you saved on the stand on a harness.
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Offline born-to-hunt

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2010, 05:16:06 PM »
those are some nice stands up there I made one last year very simple on a branch two boards along the branch to the tree and one on top of that side ways from the top it is a T shape i will try to take a pic probably hard to understand without it huh
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Offline zeke08

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2010, 11:02:20 AM »
I have hunted from built stands for years. In 1985 I went through Hunter Safety here in TN and the TWRA agents showed how to take a 4x4 block drill through it then use rope to tie it to a tree and use it as steps so as not to use screw in steps on WMA property, I had 2 different buddies fall using this poor design. My family use to put 3/4" 4x8 sheets of ply wood in the tops of oaks and use extension ladders to climb up then lay there all day with bi-pods 24-28' up geeeeeeez its a wonder we lived, and back then no one used harnesses. Now I use ladder stands bought from reputable company's and my api climber. I just don't trust built stands anymore. And there is a website where some rednecks in GA used a slide in camper mounted on 4x4's and wooden ladder they even put a front porch on it people never stop amazing me with there stupidity!
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Offline ironglow

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2010, 03:19:58 PM »
  Unless someone has already mentioned it, this new treated wood will "eat up" screws, bolts and many other hardware items. Yes, there are treated screws etc..but I don't trust them very much either. Stainless steel bolts would be nice..but costly.
   Of course, screws in such a situation are not good either..just too much out of sight.
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Offline pastorp

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Re: Homemade stands
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2020, 09:56:24 AM »
Just buy a Gillie suit and a portable seat and sit on the ground. Much safer for us old guys and the game donít seem to notice you if you move real slow.
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